Category: D.C.

The Safety Street weekly news roundup brings together a mix of road safety and transportation stories from around the web. It is published every week on Safety Street and is available on Twitter via @SaferRoadsUSA.

Seven New Traffic Cameras Posted in D.C.
D.C. police announced the installation of traffic cameras at seven locations in the District of Columbia, six of which are speed traps. The selected locations are sites where speeding and pedestrian safety has been identified to be a problem, according to police.
Source: WUSA 9

Mississippi Department of Transportation Urges Safety During Thanksgiving Travel
This Thanksgiving holiday weekend, motorists across the state will hit the roads, eager to spend time with loved ones. It’s one of the busiest travel times of the year, and that means more crashes. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) reminds all drivers that it’s always essential to wear your seat belt.
Source: WJTV 12 News

Ohio School Buses Add Stop-Arm Safety Cameras To Promote Driver Safety
Police officers and school officials hope a little extra technology will help keep kids safer heading to and coming home from school. School buses in Marion City, Ohio have added a camera on the outside of the bus — on the bus and the school bus crossing arm that extends the “stop” sign when the door opens — to help keep kids safe heading to and from school by advocating driver safety.
Source: The Marion Star

AAA Shares Tips with Drivers to Help Them Get Ready for Winter Driving
Before winter weather fully hits states across the U.S. and motorists drive in winter conditions, AAA gives drivers tips on vehicle maintenance, including replacing windshield wipers, changing washer fluid and ways to keep your car safe on the road.
Source: Idaho Statesman

South Carolina Aims to Continue to Promote Traffic Safety
South Carolina is recognized as a leader in traffic safety, according to AAA Carolinas. However, Thanksgiving season is one of the busiest and deadliest times of year on the road and over 90 percent of South Carolinians traveling this Thanksgiving holiday will be celebrating with a road trip. To promote a continuation in traffic safety, the state is pushing for more people to wear safety belts.
Source: The Times and Democrat

 

The National Coalition for Safer Roads (NCSR) helps save lives and protect communities by demonstrating how red-light safety cameras can improve driver behavior.

 

The Safety Street weekly news roundup brings together a mix of road safety and transportation stories from around the web. It is published every week on Safety Street and is available on Twitter via @SaferRoadsUSA.

New Survey: America’s Rudest Drivers Are in Idaho
A new survey from Insure.com has found that Idaho has the “rudest” drivers. The survey asked two thousand drivers which states they felt had the rudest motorists; many answers were influences by the geography of the respondents. The most common causes for complaint were drivers talking on their phones, tailgating, not signaling, weaving through lanes and speeding.
Source: Wired  

Editorial Board Supports Safety Benefits of Automated Traffic Enforcement in D.C.
The Washington Post recently posted an editorial espousing the increased safety that has resulted from red-light and speed safety cameras in the District of Columbia. D.C.’s population has increased by 13 percent in the last ten years, but traffic collisions have dropped by more than 70 percent and injuries have decreased by one-third. According to the editorial board, “The widespread and consistent enforcement of traffic laws made possible by photo enforcement has caused drivers to slow down in the District and obey the rules.”
Source: The Washington Post

Parents Lacking Knowledge of When to Move Children Out of Booster Seats
Nearly 9 in 10 parents are moving their children from booster seats to a seatbelt before they reach the recommended height, according to a new study from Safe Kids Worldwide. For years, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American Academy of Pediatrics have recommended that children ride buckled up in car seats or booster seats until they’re 57 inches tall and weigh between 80 and 100 pounds. However, the survey finds that 7 in 10 parents of children ages 4-10 are unaware of the height recommendation.
Source: USA Today

New Speed Safety Cameras Operating in Five Long Island School Districts
Speed safety cameras began operating in five new school districts in Nassau County, New York, bringing the total number of fixed and mobile speed safety camera locations to 23. By the end of the year, the county expects to install cameras in all 56 districts.
Source: Newsday

New California Law Requires Drivers to Give Space to Bicyclists
In California, a new law has taken effect requiring drivers to give bicyclists three feet of space when they pass them on the road. Prior to this law, there had been no clearly defined passing distance. The law applies to any place a vehicle passes a bicyclist, regardless of whether there’s a bike lane in the road. If there’s not enough room for a driver to give three feet of space, they must first slow down before safely passing.
Source: KPCC

                                                                   

The National Coalition for Safer Roads (NCSR) helps save lives and protect communities by demonstrating how red-light safety cameras can improve driver behavior.

On Safety Street, we often discuss the plight of pedestrian safety in the United States. An article from Next City takes a look at the effect of introducing public transit on pedestrian safety in car-centric communities. For example, the Tysons Corner area outside of Washington, D.C. has recently welcomed a light rail expansion of the metro area’s public transit system and the results have been dangerous for new pedestrians.

Historically an unwalkable area, Tysons Corner has seen renewed attention on its lackluster pedestrian planning as more residents seek to walk to the new light rail stations. Dead ends, orphan sidewalks and a lack of true crosswalks leave pedestrians to fend for themselves in and alongside the roads. The county has allocated transportation funds to develop safer walkway infrastructure, but in the meantime, pedestrians face significant peril.

City planning, camera technology and driver awareness are all critical measures that can work in concert to keep pedestrians safe and improve a community’s walkability.

To learn more, read the Next City article.

The Safety Street weekly news roundup brings together a mix of road safety and transportation stories from around the web. It is published every week on Safety Street and is available on Twitter via @SaferRoadsUSA.

U.S. Senator Introduces Car Safety Overhaul Bill
The chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee on Thursday introduced sweeping auto safety reform legislation and proposed a boost in safety staffing that would be funded by a first-ever new federal vehicle fee. The Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 2014 would give the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration more funding to conduct more investigations and stronger powers to get unsafe vehicles off the road more quickly. It would boost funding for federal auto safety oversight by more than $100 million to $280 million by 2017.
Source: The Detroit News

New Law Allows Additional Speed Cameras for NYC and Long Island
Legislation authorizing new speed cameras for New York City, Suffolk and Nassau counties was signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The law allows for 120 new cameras to be installed near school zones in New York City, as well as 69 cameras in Suffolk County and 56 in Nassau. That brings the total in the city to 140, added to the 20 cameras authorized under a 2013 pilot program. All the cameras are required to shut off an hour after school ends, which means most stop issuing tickets around 4 pm.
Source: Transportation Nation

Large Trucks Adopt New Car Safety Measures
Large trucks may be involved in fewer crashes than passenger vehicles, but their size almost guarantees that the consequences of those collisions will be severe. Recent fatal truck collisions are bringing enewed attention to issues of commercial vehicle safety. Among the measures being discussed is an effort to equip more 18-wheelers with collision-avoidance systems like those available — or required by law — on new cars. These systems detect cars in blog spots, apply brakes when oncoming traffic is not acknowledged by the driver and more.
Source: The New York Times

Alabama City’s Red-Light Safety Cameras Reducing Collisions
Phenix City, Alabama set up its first red-light safety camera last April, and since then, the city has seen a 36% decrease in collisions at that intersection.  Such positive results have set the plan in motion to add four new cameras to other dangerous intersections across the city.
Source: WTVM

D.C. Sidewalks Under Construction Put Pedestrians in Harms Way
Pedestrian rights organization All Walks D.C. has highlighted the fact that Washington, D.C. sidewalks blocked by construction sites are forcing pedestrians to walk in the street. At many of these construction sites, there is no other recourse for pedestrians. The group has called on the D.C Department of Transportation to enforce a local law that keeps construction companies from blocking the sidewalk without safe accommodation.
Source: WAMU

                                                                   

The National Coalition for Safer Roads (NCSR) helps save lives and protect communities by demonstrating how red-light safety cameras can improve driver behavior.

The Safety Street weekly news roundup brings together a mix of road safety and transportation stories from around the web. It is published every week on Safety Street and is available on Twitter via @SaferRoadsUSA.

New York State Legislature Passes Bill to Lower Speed Limit in New York City
Both houses of the New York State Legislature have voted to give New York City the authority to lower its speed limit to 25 miles per hour. Passage of the bill was hailed by city officials and advocates alike who see it as crucial to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero approach. The bill now goes to Governor Cuomo’s desk for signature. He is expected to sign it.
Source: Transportation Nation

New D.C. Traffic Safety Cameras Begin Ticketing
Drivers in Washington, D.C. will begin receiving tickets from 15 new traffic safety cameras. Of the cameras, 14 issue violations for speeding and one issues tickets to oversized vehicles. The speed safety cameras primarily target areas with posted speed limits of 25 miles per hour and are stationed across the city. The fees for speeding will increase as drivers reach certain speed thresholds above the limit.
Source: NBC Washington

Connecticut City Pilots New Pedestrian Flag Program
The city of Bridgeport, Connecticut is piloting a new program aimed at increasing pedestrian safety through the use of crosswalk flags. The idea is simple: Carry a neon-colored flag while crossing the street, and it’s more likely a car will see you. The city has provided small one-foot by one-foot flags that pedestrians can hold to make drivers more aware that they are going to cross.
Source: WNPR

Albany Red-Light Cameras Approved by State Legislature
The New York State Legislature passed the bill that would allow the city of Albany to purchase and install up to 20 red-light safety cameras at intersections throughout the city. Violations will come with a $50 fine. The city of Albany will look at accident data to determine where the red-light safety cameras will be installed.
Source: Q103 Albany

New Protected Bike Lane Design Could Save Lives
An urban planner from Portland, Oregon has designed a new protected intersection that would make intersections less stressful and safer for bicyclists. Taking a note from Dutch protected bike lanes, the new design features four components: extended protection into the intersection; a stop area for cyclists just past the crosswalk so they are more visible to motorists; a setback crossing to allow more time for reaction; and bike-specific signals.
Source: Wired

                                                                   

The National Coalition for Safer Roads (NCSR) helps save lives and protect communities by demonstrating how red-light safety cameras can improve driver behavior.

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